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TS vs TC: Side-by-s...
 
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TS vs TC: Side-by-side comparison  


clsmooth
Posts: 6
(@clsmooth)
Active Member
Joined: 4 weeks ago

Bit of a back story:

I used to ride 2-stroke 50cc’s for about 10 years or so.  Since January 1st of 2014 or 2015, you’re no longer allowed to import 2-stroke engines into Canada.  That leaves only 4-strokes, and a 4-stroke 50 can get dangerously slow in a big city.

I’ve been seeing Soco’s advertised in my area for a year or 2 now, and like the idea of electric, and they look cool! So I took some for test rides yesterday.  (One will be a personal  reward after successful job hunting!)

Went to my local dealer and talked to the salesman.  I told him I called about a week or 2 ago if they had any Soco’s to test ride.  He then asked, ‘Which one?  Or how about both?’ (They have both TS and TC).  I said if it’s not too much trouble, both would be great, and he was fine with it.

So I got to test ride a white TS, then a black TC, then the TS again and then the TC again – about a half hour each time.  I was at the dealership for over 2.5 hours.

I’m not posting this to say one’s better than the other, just the differences I personally noticed (which may or may not be of any significance to you).

Each bike had 1 battery, no other options that I knew of, rode each in Sport (3) mode and had about the same amount of km’s.  Also during the day in about 20*C dry overcast on city streets and alleys.  I took the same route each time, with a mix of slight uphill, slight downhill and flats.

So here’s the similarities and differences I noticed:

Sitting & adjustments –

BOTH

Before I took off, needed to know how the bikes felt.  I have to ride upright cause of an old  back injury.  On both bikes the foot pegs happened to be at a pretty good spots for me that allowed me to sit upright and feel balanced with my feet pretty much under me. 

I was impressed I was actually able to use the mirrors on both to see behind me!  I was so used to useless mirrors where I’d only end up seeing my arms.

Handlebars were arranged nice on both.  Not too far from you, not too close.  Not too wide, not too narrow.

TS

The gauge cluster was nice & big and easy to read, though just a matter of getting used to layout of where everything is and what info you’re looking at.  I’m sure it’d be second nature after a while.

The ‘sporty’ seat really holds in you place, if that’s something you prefer.  Comfortable, wasn’t sore or stiff at all afterwards.

TC

Smaller gauge cluster, harder time seeing the speedo at first, had to lean in to see other info.  But REALLY liked how it had a ‘range-remaining’ feature.  Don’t recall seeing that on the TS.  Again, I’m sure it’d be second nature after a while.

The ‘banana’ seat gives you some wiggle room as to how far back you can or want to sit, if that’s something you prefer.  I did notice pulling myself forward or pushing myself to get back into my personal ‘sweet spot’.  I think it’s just the material the seat’s made of.  A cover or re-upholstered in something else could fix that.  Comfortable as well though, wasn’t sore or stiff at all afterwards.

Acceleration & top speed –

BOTH

The salesman was right and torque was RIGHT there as soon as you twist the throttle.  Didn’t seem to matter if you hold it at 1% or 100%, the bikes were just ‘on’ and went.  Just a little tricky when trying to creep ahead up to a stop line or look around a corner.  Didn’t bother me, I felt I could get used to it.

The dealer’s located VERY within the city, so I wasn’t close to any roads where I could REALLY check out top speed, but managed to get both up to 70 kmh on the same, longest stretch I could find.  The TC’s suppose to have a higher top speed.  Both seemed to accelerate at the same rate, so I imagine the TC would eventually get to the higher top speed it’s rated at.  I honestly found no noticeable difference.

I swear the TS felt slightly lighter then the TC, but has a slightly lower top speed.  The TC on the other hand, I swear felt slightly heavier, but has a slightly higher top speed.  So I believe this is why acceleration felt the same; the differences cancel each other out.

The controllers stayed cool on both, neither temp gauge on either bike moved up more then 1 bar.  I noticed the motor in the wheel in both was warm.  Neither bike has a temp gauge for the motor, just the controller and batteries.  I imagine the spinning of the wheel in open air keeps the motor cool enough.  I also think there’s a benefit to this as it keeps your rear tire at a more consistent temperature.

Suspension –

BOTH

Both bikes had a pretty stiff suspension.  But still comfortable going over normal road pavement.  I could feel the nuances of the road beneath me, but didn’t hurt or felt like I had to worry.  I believe the rear shock on both bikes were adjusted to the about same height and softness.

TS

I went over this, 80? year old section of ancient pavement on this one road, and the TS did NOT like it.  I think this is where the lighter feeling of it came into play.  Maybe the suspension is more “sport” oriented?  The S in TS is for sport? I think the narrower and shorter tires were a factor.  Not a deterrent, just don’t run over crap.

TC

The TC went over the ancient pavement a bit smoother.  I think its weight and wider & taller tires helped.  The suspension might be slightly more comfort oriented?  The C in TC is for cruising or comfort?  But you still shouldn’t be aiming for crappy pavement in any case.

Steering –

TS

Next to no effort moving the handlebar back and forth.  The TS didn’t mind if you put a bit of lean around corners either.  I attribute this to the smoother, narrower tires and what felt like a slightly lighter bike.

TC

More effort to move the handlebar, but nothing alarming.  Just noticeable.  The TC didn’t like being leaned as much.  On one corner the front tire actually started to squeal and under steered a few cm’s.  I attribute this to the wider and taller tires the demo bike happened to have with a brick pattern to it and it feeling slightly heavier.

 

Braking –

BOTH

Both bikes braked exceptionally well.  Really like how they both have dual disc brakes, and how the front is larger then the rear.  Just letting go of the throttle I could feel a bit of the regenerative braking working the motor.

Both bikes had the same size rotors, front and rear, and looked like the same caliper size front and rear as well.

TS

First time I hit the brakes I wasn’t prepared and lifted off the seat a little bit!  I think this is cause the bike feels like and has slotted rotors.  Braking happened to be silent on the demo I rode.

TC

Slightly noticeable softer braking.  Never came off the seat anyway.  Though the TC has dual-hose front brake caliper.  Maybe cause it feels heavier?  The TC also made quite a bit of noise braking.  I think the TC could benefit from slotted rotors as it comes with solid ones.  Maybe the pads have to be heat cycled and seated more.  I’m sure the noise would go away over time.

 

That’s all I can think of at the moment.  I’m already brainstorming ideas for one!  Might have some questions in the meantime…

6 Replies
clsmooth
Posts: 6
(@clsmooth)
Active Member
Joined: 4 weeks ago

And an interesting note too:

I had a few questions after my test rides that the salesman was able to help with me.  I had questions about the warranty period and how much major components would cost after the warranty expired.

As of right now, if a replacement battery was needed, they're $1300 CAD each.
If I needed a replacement motor in the wheel, as of now they're $350 CAD.
And if I needed a controller, they're $400 - $500 CAD right now, "depending on which one exactly" he said.  He would need the VIN to make sure.  He had 2 different part numbers, one for the TS and one for the TC.  Which makes me thinking that the difference is what's called the "map" in the gas world, which is basically things like settings.

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3 Replies
DocWeyr
(@docweyr)
Joined: 2 months ago

Eminent Member
Posts: 35

@clsmooth

Hello - nice comparation. 🙂 Just a few more things you may wish to know.

1. Yes, engines in TS and TC are a bit different - look at specs. 

2. You can install second acu to double your range. Does not upgrade power.

3. Ask for TCmax. It is a new model on market (I have one). ~40% more power and max speed. New battery and engine. Looks a bit different - they connect it to cafe racers. Gives more fun especially on faster roads. It is a bit more expensive but it has bigger battery what is more or less equivalent in range for double batteries in older TC/TS - double - means as you said + $1300 CAD for second battery and something extra for Y-connector for them. If you need longer range and resonably more power - price looks still resonable.

Have a safe ride!

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clsmooth
(@clsmooth)
Joined: 4 weeks ago

Active Member
Posts: 6

@docweyr

I don't believe the TC Max is available in Canada yet.  But I do know you can get Zero motorcycles here...

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DocWeyr
(@docweyr)
Joined: 2 months ago

Eminent Member
Posts: 35

@clsmooth - we do not have Zero in Poland - so one can order shipping but with no local service etc.. But let's note Zero is 3-4x more expensive and much faster. It is a talk like about small and medium car. 🙂 They are very different. Btw - I visited Zero dealer in Scotland 4 weeks ago. Interesting bike but I am not fan of position on a seat - a bit too short for big driver I am.:-)

 

But still - it is different segment of e-motorbike.

 

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patjepatatje
Posts: 53
(@patjepatatje)
Trusted Member
Joined: 1 year ago

hi,

I had th Tc for 1 year now and i promise that the break noise still is there, and when it rains it gets LOUD.

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Super Honda
Posts: 106
(@super-honda)
Estimable Member
Joined: 1 year ago

TC

Smaller gauge cluster, harder time seeing the speedo at first, had to lean in to see other info.  But REALLY liked how it had a ‘range-remaining’ feature.  Don’t recall seeing that on the TS.  Again, I’m sure it’d be second nature after a while.

 

TS can toggle between RPM - Range - Trip in the upper left top corner;

2019 10 05 234318

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